System Center Updates Publisher (SCUP) Load Error

SCUP Error

Introduction

System Center Updates Publisher (SCUP) is a great tool for IT administrators to use to help push out 3rd party updates. These can include updates for Adobe Flash Player, Adobe Acrobat, HP, Dell and Lenovo.

Thre are also a large number of catalogs that you can purchase or subscribe to so that you can gather updates for other programs.

SCUP Error on Load

Whilst starting this program, you may find that it crashes and the main logo fades out. It will also popup an error box with various information. There is no way to gain access into the software at this point.

SCUP Error
SCUP Error Crash on Load

Corrupt Database

The problem is a corrupt database for the software. Meaning that when you try and start up the software, it cannot connect to its database and fails.

How to Fix

The fix for this error is very simple, just go to the following location:

C:\Users\%username%\AppData\Local\Microsoft\System Center Updates Publisher 2011

Then rename the folder. Once you have done that, try to start the SCUP program. You should now see that it loads perfectly well.

Feedback

If you have any questions on this guide, or if you want to leave us any feedback on whether this worked for you, please leave us a message below in our comments section.

Microsoft Update causing Print Spooler Problems – CVE-2019-1367

Microsoft Blue Logo

Microsoft released an emergency update last week under CVE-2019-1367 which claimed to fix an Internet Explorer exploit. If you are now reading this post, I’m assuming that you have already noticed that having installed these set of updates, you now have print spooler problems?! CVE-2019-1367 v1.0 As most businesses probably have, we urgently rushed out … Read more

How to Manually Update to Windows 1903

Microsoft Windows 10 Methods for upgrade to Windows 1903

If you are looking to update your Windows 10 to the latest version of 1903, you would normally just head into Settings > Update and Security and then check for Windows Updates. You should then be presented with any Windows Updates that your machine requires and allow them to install. Once complete, reboot your machine … Read more

Google Chrome MSI Installer Version 71.0.3578.98

Google Chrome MSI 85 Installer

Do you want the Google Chrome MSI Installer to use with systems like SCCM, WDS, Group Policy or SCUP? If the answer is yes, then take a quick read of our guide below.

Google have pushed out another update to their Chrome browser, taking it up to version 71.0.3578.98.

If you are looking to mass deploy the new version of Google Chrome, or at the very least keep it up to date, then you can control the deployment by using the official MSI installer that Google provide. This way, you can publish the latest version through your Software Center if you are using SCCM or push it straight out using Group Policy.

You can now download the Google Chrome MSI installer direct from Google using the link below.

Download

Download Google Chrome MSI Installer

Versions

There are now a number of different versions of Google Chrome for various platforms. All the below are available from the link above.

Latest Releases

TypeVersionSize
Chrome MSI for Windows 64-bit
v 71.0.3578.9850.3 MB
Chrome MSI for Windows 32-bit
v 71.0.3578.9846.3 MB
Chrome DMG for OS X
v 71.0.3578.9862.2 MB

ADMX Files

TypeSize
Chrome ADM/ADMX Templates
13.1 MB

Chrome Updater ADMX Templates

TypeSize
Google Updater ADM Template Update
403 KB
Google Updater ADMX Template Update
21 KB

Instructions

If you are pushing this out in your corporate environment, you will want to use the silent installer switches, so this is the command line that you should use for this:

msiexec.exe /i "GoogleChromeStandaloneEnterprise.msi" /q /norestart

This means it will install quietly (using the /q switch) and will not reboot automatically (using the /norestart) switch.

You can also use the /qb+ switch to show a basic UI.

Feedback

We would love to hear your feedback on this article so come and join us on Facebook or Twitter or just leave us a message below.

KB4457139 – Windows Server 2008 NIC Issues

Microsoft Blue Logo

We have over the last week or so had problems with Windows Server 2008 servers where, although they seem to be connecting through the network without any problems, like filestores, the servers could not be remoted onto and when running an ipconfig would return no data.

You can see the number of Microsoft Updates that have been problematic for Windows users that have been released over the last few months by looking through our articles here.

A lot of the recent issues have been either network card or wireless related and it does seem very strange that this just seems to keep happening. Are Microsoft trying to push everyone onto Windows 10 and Server 2016? Surely they wouldn’t do that, would they?

KB4457139 – (Preview of Monthly Rollup)

So the update you should be looking out for now is KB4457139. This is a preview of monthly rollup for Windows operating systems. Below is directly from the updates KB page explaining exactly what the problems are in relation to this latest release.

Note that Microsoft have very kindly included a “workaround” – would be nice if they didn’t screw it up in the first place though wouldn’t it?!

Known issues in this update


Symptom Workaround
After you apply this update, the network interface controller may stop working on some client software configurations. This occurs because of an issue related to a missing file, oem<number>.inf. The exact problematic configurations are currently unknown.
  1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc. It may appear under Other Devices.
  2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu.

a. Alternatively, install the drivers for the network device by right-clicking the device and choosing Update. Then choose Search automatically for updated driver software or Browse my computer for driver software.

We have just rebooted the servers with this update and they do seem to be fine after that, so not as bad as recent updates.

If you are still experiencing any weird issues with your machines, take a stab at removing this dodgy update and see if it helps.

How to Remove Problem Updates

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these or any other updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post that you may find helpful.

Who knows, in the future far, far away, we may be able to go a week without Microsoft releasing a dodgy update!

Feedback

We would love to hear your feedback on this article so come and join us on Facebook or Twitter or just leave us a comment below and let us know what you think!

KB4457144 – Windows 7 Rollup May Cause NIC Issues

KB4457144

Windows 7 seems to have been suffering a lot recently with Microsoft releasing updates on an almost weekly basis that breaks something within the still popular Operating System.

You can see the number of Microsoft Updates that have been problematic for Windows 7 users that have been released over the last few months by looking through our articles here.

Well it seems that after another Patch Tuesday passes us by, yet another update could cause Windows 7 network cards to start not working.

A lot of the recent issues have been either network card or wireless related and it does seem very strange that this just seems to keep happening. Are Microsoft trying to push everyone onto Windows 10? Surely they wouldn’t do that, would they?

KB4457144 (Monthly Rollup)

So the update you should be looking out for now is KB4457144. This is a monthly rollup for Windows 7. Below is directly from the updates KB page explaining exactly what the problems are in relation to this latest release.

Note that Microsoft have very kindly included a “workaround” – would be nice if they didn’t screw it up in the first place though wouldn’t it?!


Symptom

Workaround

After you apply this update, the network interface controller may stop working on some client software configurations. This occurs because of an issue related to a missing file, oem<number>.inf. The exact problematic configurations are currently unknown.
  1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc. It may appear under Other Devices.
  2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu.

a. Alternatively, install the drivers for the network device by right-clicking the device and choosing Update. Then choose Search automatically for updated driver software or Browse my computer for driver software.

If you are still experiencing any weird issues with your machines, take a stab at removing this dodgy update and see if it helps.

How to Remove Problem Updates

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these or any other updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post that you may find helpful.

Who knows, in the future far, far away, we may be able to go a week without Microsoft releasing a dodgy update!

Feedback

We would love to hear your feedback on this article so come and join us on Facebook or Twitter or just leave us a comment below and let us know what you think!

Broken Microsoft Update – KB4338818

microsoft black logo

You may have installed Microsoft Update KB4338818 during Patch Tuesday and now your Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 is broken right? Maybe even some Windows 7 machines?

Well guess what? You are not the only one!

Yes, Microsoft have done it yet again, released a dirty update that this time hits your Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 machines and Microsoft Windows 7 SP1 machines.

To be exact, KB4338818 causes a problem with your Network Interface Controller (NIC), whereas after applying the update, the card stops working in Windows!

The official information from Microsoft is below.

Known issues in this update (KB4338818)

Symptom Workaround
There is an issue with Windows and third-party software related to a missing file (oem<number>.inf). Because of this issue, after you apply this update, the network interface controller will stop working.
  1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc; it may appear under Other Devices.
  2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu.

a. Alternatively, install the drivers for the network device by right-clicking the device and selecting Update. Then select Search automatically for updated driver software or Browse my computer for driver software.

Microsoft have given their above “Workarounds” but none of these worked for us.

So, if you are still experiencing any weird issues with your machines, take a stab at removing these and see if it helps.

How to Remove Problem Updates

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these or any other updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post that you may find helpful.

Who knows, in the future far, far away, we may be able to go a week without Microsoft releasing a dodgy update!

Feedback

We would love to hear your feedback on this article so come and join us on Facebook or Twitter and let us know what you think!

New Broken Microsoft Updates – KB4284842

microsoft black logo

Microsoft have done it again and released another update “fix” which has broken Windows 7 machines. This seems to be the same sort of issue as before where the wifi and VPN connections are affected.

It is quite unbelievable that Microsoft continue to release updates that break our user machines! You can forgive the odd bad update, but this has been weekly lately. Strange that these updates are only ever affecting Windows 7 machines as well – trying to force us onto Windows 10 Microsoft?

So, another morning of investigation and we found that removing update KB4284842 seems to have fixed the reboot loop issues on our Windows 7 user machines.

Problem Updates

KB4284842 – Known issues in this update:

Symptom Workaround
There is an issue with Windows and a third-party software that is related to a missing file (oem<number>.inf). Because of this issue, after you apply this update, the network interface controller will stop working.
  1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc; it may appear under Other Devices.
  2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu.

a. Alternatively, install the drivers for the network device by right-clicking the device and selecting Update.Then select Search automatically for updated driver software or Browse my computer for driver software.

Microsoft have given their above “Workarounds” but none of these worked for us.

So, if you are still experiencing any weird issues with your machines, take a stab at removing these and see if it helps.

How to Remove Problem Updates

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these or any other updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post that you may find helpful.

Feedback

We would love to hear from you if you to are having any issues with these, or indeed any other, Microsoft Updates. Just leave us a message below in our comments section and we will pick them up shortly after you post.

KB4284826 & KB4284867 Might Break Windows 7 Machines

Microsoft Blue Logo

Microsoft are really outdoing themselves at the moment as it seems that they have released another pair of updates for Windows 7 machines that reboots the computer when connecting to a wireless or VPN connection.

We have had around 40 machines with these two updates that have seen this problem. We have had to remove these from circlation on our corporate network and for external users, we have had to manually remove them and clear out the SoftwareDistribution folder to stop them reinstalling.

Problem Updates

This is what Microsoft have admitted to so far:

KB4284826

A few symptoms they have mentioned, but nothing about wireless or VPN connections being affected – but we have had this problem.

Symptom Workaround
There is an issue with Windows and third-party software that is related to a missing file (oem<number>.inf). Because of this issue, after you apply this update, the network interface controller will stop working.
  1. To locate the network device, launch devmgmt.msc; it may appear under Other Devices.
  2. To automatically rediscover the NIC and install drivers, select Scan for Hardware Changes from the Action menu.

a. Alternatively, install the drivers for the network device by right-clicking the device and selecting Update. Then select Search automatically for updated driver software or Browse my computer for driver software.

KB4284867

Nothing from Microsoft on this one yet, but we have seen problems with it.

So, if you are still experiencing any weird issues with your machines, take a stab at removing these and see if it helps.

How to Remove Problem Updates

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these or any other updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post that you may find helpful.

Feedback

We would love to hear from you if you to are having any issues with these, or indeed any other, Microsoft Updates. Just leave us a message below in our comments section and we will pick them up shortly after you post.

Microsoft Updates – More Faulty Updates – KB4103712

Microsoft Blue Logo

After our recent posts about Microsoft releasing faulty updates and breaking user computers, we have now found yet another Microsoft Update which has been causing a problem with machines rebooting themselves quite randomly and completely losing network connections.

Again we have done a load of testing and Googling and found the update to be KB4103712.

Problem Update

This is a direct reference from Microsoft about the problems with this update.

KB4103712 – Known Issues in this update

Symptom

Workaround

A stop error occurs on computers that don’t support Streaming Single Instructions Multiple Data (SIMD) Extensions 2 (SSE2). Microsoft is working on a resolution and will provide an update in an upcoming release.
Microsoft is aware that some customers have reported that network drivers are intentionally uninstalled, then fail to reinstall after applying the May 8, 2018 update. This can result in the loss of network connectivity. Microsoft is presently investigating and will provide a status update when the investigation is complete.

So another Microsoft Update that breaks the NIC! As usual, Microsoft are “investigating” whilst the rest of us IT guys have to sort out their mess on our users computers:

Microsoft is presently investigating and will provide a status update when the investigation is complete.

If you are using WSUS or Configuration Manager, our advise would be to remote the update from being pushed and get it uninstalled off users machines.

A Month of Broken Updates

We have posted our broken Microsoft Updates for a while but this last month has been terrible for them. Within the last month we have reported bad updates on the following:

How to Remove Problem Updates

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these or any other updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post that you may find helpful.

We will continue to post about any bad Microsoft Updates that we come across.

Feedback

We would love to hear from you if you to are having any issues with these, or indeed any other, Microsoft Updates. Just leave us a message below in our comments section and we will pick them up shortly after you post.

New Tuesday New Broken Microsoft Updates – KB4103713 & KB4130978

microsoft black logo

So it looks like Microsoft have done it yet again! Yes more updates have been causing us problems and we have had to go through a number of user machines uninstalling two more updates to fix broken computers. It is quite unbelievable that Microsoft continue to release updates that break our user machines! This seems … Read more

KB4099950 & KB4093113 – Yet More Faulty Windows Updates Released by Microsoft

microsoft black logo

A few days ago we posted here about two Microsoft updates that had been causing us a number of problems with our older Windows 7 machines.

We thought that we had resolved all of our issues in relation to these updates, but we have this week seen machines dropping off the network and ramdomly rebooting themselves when connecting to wireless networks.

Again, after much Googling and removing updates one by one, we finally came to the conclusion that two more Microsoft updates were also causing us problems with the same older Windows 7 machines.

Offending Updates

KB4099950 – Although it does look like an update has been released by Microsoft now but you will still have to remove the previous update under the same KB release.

KB4093113 – Not as much information out there about this one, but when we removed this on some machines, they started working again so may need a bit of trial and error on your own machines.

Do a bit of basic searching on the internet and you will find a load of people complaining about these two updates.

So, if you are still experiencing any weird issues with your machines, take a stab at removing these and see if it helps.

Removal Guide

If you need some guidance on what to do to remove these updates, be it on a single machine or mass corporation remove, take a look at this post as we have added some instructions towards the end of the post.

Feedback

We would love to hear from you if you to are having any issues with these, or indeed any other, Microsoft Updates. Just leave us a message below in our comments section.