Why roulette still retains popularity in the face of modern casino games

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When you think of roulette, the immediate thing that pops into your mind is, perhaps, the simple thrill it brings with it being the ultimate game of chance and the competitive side it brings out of a player as they become desperate to predict the right outcome – a black or a red pocket.

The likes of James Bond have bought roulette and other games to public attention in films, amongst a whole host of other shows too. It’s a popular game with mass appeal, that’s for sure. It’s easy to grasp, uncomplicated compared to others, fun and can be highly lucrative.

Roulette has a strong heritage dating back to 1655, thanks to the French physicist Blaise Pascal’s attempts to create a perpetual motion machine which produced the global phenomenon of “the little wheel”. The roulette mechanism itself is a hybrid of a gaming wheel invented in 1720 and a game that was hugely popular in Italy called Biribi.

Connoisseurs of roulette would argue that it isn’t as random as many people would suggest, in fact, many play their own tactical games and attempt to master the physics and pattern ideas that emerge as the game progresses. There’s certainly more skill to it than many perhaps realise, but it is easier to understand than many other more traditional casino offerings too. 

Roulette is, though, a game of chance essentially. Winning is far from guaranteed but a lucky streak could certainly result in a potentially lucrative return and plenty of enjoyment. Perhaps this is why that even in a modern world where games are offering far more advanced graphics and features than ever before, a more traditional game like roulette still has a place in any casino, be it online or in real life table side at an actual casino.

Perhaps due to its public image from films such as the aforementioned James Bond and the flash, upmarket looking casinos the game is usually played in, Roulette does tend to have a high roller game image, with players playing for huge stakes, yet you can still find penny roulette games at UK casinos today. It certainly isn’t inclusive to high stakes players, with a number of different
versions of roulette available, making it a game for all.

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(Image via – https://twitter.com/USAroulette)

Albert Einstein supposedly once said: “No one can win at roulette unless he steals money from the table while the croupier isn’t looking.”

Although it’s hard to argue with Einstein, he isn’t entirely correct on this one. In fact, Einstein’s specialist subject, physics, can apparently help you with the game. Alongside that, a biased wheel could materialise meaning it’s easier to predict what’s coming. Einstein is largely correct though – no player is guaranteed to constantly win, which is exactly why knowing when to stop following a losing streak is also a skill in itself.

Roulette’s iconic status will always stand it in good stead moving into an advancing modern world where games are progressing and changing all the time. Its thrill factor will never fade, its image portrayed in certain films will always persuade people to give it a go and, most importantly of all, the casual enjoyment it provides make it an easy and fun game to play. It’s hardly like a game of poker where you have to remember certain card sequences, attempt to read the mind of an opponent and call their bluff, or become stuck in a never-ending game you simply can’t escape from. It’s here to stay.

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About Annabel Johnson

Part time gamer, reviewer and blogger. Full time geek and tech expert!

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